The Highest Point in Texas

To finish off our look at National Parks and Monuments of the Great Plains, let’s take a look at Guadalupe Mountains National Park in Texas.  To be precise, GMNP is not in the Great Plains, but at the northern edge of the Chihauhuan Desert, which extends well into Mexico.  The reason I’m including it here is because the highest peak in the park (also the highest peak in Texas) is the proposed southern terminus for the Great Plains Trail, and that’s what this blog is all about.  There are lots of reasons to include this peak as part of the trail, but let’s just say this:  The view of the Great Plains from the summit of the 8,749 peak would be spectacular!

I say “would be,” and here’s where I would be inserting my own photo of the view from the summit from a recent trip there with Great Plains Trail Alliance board member Kevin Purdy.  Unfortunately, a fire in the park closed the trail and thwarted our bid for the summit.  So, until I can make it back down there, here’s a link to some images from the peak: Peak Images

Also, for one more look at the impressive range of peaks in GMNP, check out our website, www.greatplainstrail.org  and watch as the pictures scroll through. While you’re there, please consider giving us a hand by donating to the Great Plains Trail Alliance.  With your help, we can make the vision for this trail a reality!

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About greatplainstrail

Building the Great Plains Trail.
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One Response to The Highest Point in Texas

  1. trailsnet says:

    As I can vouch from our recent Great Plains Trail scouting expedition, the high points and low points on the plains both offer incredible scenery. Places like the Guadalupe Mountains & Capulin Volcano afford spectacular views of the surrounding plains while canyons & valleys such as the Purgatory River valley and Mills Canyon (on the Canadian River) provide a stunning look at places that are hidden from view when scanning the horizon. The side trips from the Great Plains Trail will be a huge draw for those willing to leave the beaten path.

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